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1880-1885

Newspapers 1885-1890

1890-1895

Index
 

Newspaper headlines and excerpts from the reports of England's matches, with selected news and sporting headlines of the day.

Season 1885-86

   

The Times - Monday 7th December, 1885

LONDON 2 GLASGOW 5

There was a large gathering at Kennington-oval on Saturday to witness the fourth annual encounter between these associations. London won the toss, and at 2 40 the visitors started the ball from the eastern goal...

   

The Times - Monday 18th January, 1886

GENTLEMEN 1 PLAYERS 0
a first half Nevill Cobbold goal.

Saturday was the day fixed for the first contest of this character, and Deepdale, Preston, the ground chosen, so that the Players, most of whom live in the Midlands and North of England, had not so far to travel as their opponents. The elevens placed in the field may be regarded as fairly representative. Several thousand spectators were on the ground, which was rather heavy after the recent rains. At the outset the Players had the wind in their favour, and also the benefit of a slight incline...

   

The Times - Monday 1st February, 1886

SOUTH 3 NORTH 0

The first match of general interest which has been played in the South of England since professionalism became recognized by the Football Association was decided on Saturday at Kennington-oval, when these divisions of the country were placed in opposition. Rain fell incessantly, and caused the turf to be very slippery, especially on the lower side. The North won the toss, and chose the western goal, which gave them the advantage of the wind, the home eleven starting the ball two or three minutes before 3 o'clock...

   

The Times - Monday 1st March, 1886

WALES 5 IRELAND 0

The Irish Association sent a team to Wrexham to play against the Principality eleven on Saturday. The game was played on the racecourse before a numerous company of onlookers. At first Wales, who lost the toss, had a light wind in their faces. The home team showed superior combination, but it was nearly half-time before they obtained any definite advantage. W. Roberts then scored for them, and a few minutes later the sides crossed over. On resuming, Wales still got the better of the play. A well made corner-kick by Vaughan enabled Wilding to register a second goal for the home team, for whom a third point was scored soon afterwards by R. Hersce. Although Ireland played up determinedly, they were unable to prevent W. Roberts shooting the ball under their cross-bar a fourth time. Sisson secured another goal for Wales, who, when "Time" was called, were left victorious by five goals to none.

WALES GO TOP OF BRITISH CHAMPIONSHIP

LONDON 1 BIRMINGHAM 1

Elevens chosen from these Associations played a match at Kennington-oval on Saturday. Although the weather was intensely cold there was a fair attendance of spectators, who witnessed a capital game. Mitchell started the ball for London at 20 minutes past 3 from the western goal...

 
26 13-Mar-1886 Ireland 1 England 6 [1-2] Ulster Cricket Ground, Ballynafeigh Park, Belfast BC AW
   

The Times – Monday 15th March, 1886

Ireland suffered another reverse at the hands of the England eleven on Saturday at the grounds of the Ulster club at Belfast. There was a very large attendance of spectators. Successful in the toss, the home team chose the end which gave them the advantage of the wind. Lindley kicked off for England. Good passing between the English right wings having been checked by the home backs the play became even. Williams scored the first point of the game for Ireland, whose success was naturally greeted with loud applause. England speedily retaliated, and Spilsbury brought the score level, while shortly afterwards Dewhurst obtained a second goal for the visitors. Nothing further was registered before half-time. Positions having been exchanged the form of the England team improved. Indeed, throughout the second half of the game Ireland were continually acting on the defensive. Four times was the ball driven under their cross-bar, thrice by Spilsbury and once by Lindley.

ENGLAND GO JOINT TOP OF BRITISH CHAMPIONSHIP WITH WALES

IRELAND ELIMINATED

Meanwhile, Blackburn Rovers defeated Swifts, 2-1, at Derby, in the F.A. Cup semi-final. Swifts' goal was netted by Charlie Bambridge, who had scored eleven times for England, including the equaliser against Scotland, the previous year. In the final, Blackburn were to complete a hat-trick of victories in the competition, the last occasion that the trophy has been won by the same club in three consecutive years.

The rugby union international between Scotland and England, delayed by a week because of heavy snow, ended scoreless in Edinburgh.

It was on 13 March 1886 that the Prime Minister, William Gladstone finally revealed his plans for an Irish parliament in Dublin. The Home Rule Bill, which followed, was to split the Liberal party and bring down the government, four months later.

 
   

The Times - Monday 22nd March, 1886

GENTLEMEN 1 PLAYERS 2

The second match between Gentlemen and Players began at 3 45, Thomson kicking off for the professionals from the western goal, the Gentlemen having the wind in front of them...

IRELAND 2 SCOTLAND 7

On Saturday this annual international match under Association rules was played at Belfast. There was a large attendance of spectators. For some considerable time after the kick-off the play between the forwards was very spirited, and the backs on both sides showed good defence. At length the visitors made a determined inroad into their rivals' quarters, and the ball was shot between the posts by Heggie. This success he soon afterwards repeated. Ireland now retaliated, and Condy scored for them. The Scotch soon reasserted themselves, and four more goals were speedily obtained (two kicked by Heggie and one each by Dunbar and Gourlay). Once more Ireland were incited to increased vigour, and Johnston, who had the ball well passed to him by Gibb, gained a second point for them...

They did not score, however, while, on the other hand, Heggie added a further point for the visitors. Thus when time was called the Scottish were left the winners by seven goals to two.

CHAMPIONS FOR THE PAST TWO YEARS, SCOTLAND GO JOINT TOP OF BRITISH CHAMPIONSHIP WITH ENGLAND AND WALES

 
27 27-Mar-1886 Scotland 1 England 1 [0-1] Hampden Park, Crosshill, Glasgow BC AD
   

The Times – Monday 29th March, 1886

It seemed at one time highly improbable that this season's match between England and Scotland would take place owing to the Scotch Association refusing to recognise professionalism. Matters, however, having been satisfactorily arranged between the national Associations, the game was played at Glasgow on Saturday. The weather proved very unfavourable, rain falling incessantly, and the turf was consequently heavy. Still, the inclement afternoon did not deter upwards of 10,000 persons assembling at Hampden-park to witness the fifteenth annual match...

England now made determined attempts to score, but, although several corner kicks fell to the invaders, more than half an hour had elapsed since the start when the first goal was registered, Lindley, the English centre forward, guiding the ball between the posts...

Scotland now showed good form, and the home team managed to equalize the score, Somerville obtaining the second goal of the match after a corner kick...

ENGLAND AND THE CHAMPIONS FOR THE PAST TWO YEARS, SCOTLAND STAY JOINT TOP OF BRITISH CHAMPIONSHIP

It was on 26 March 1886 that two members of the Cabinet resigned over the Prime Minister's Irish Home Rule proposals.

 
28 29-Mar-1886 Wales 1 England 3 [1-0] Racecourse Ground, Mold Road, Wrexham BC AW
   

The Times – Tuesday 30th March, 1886

Yesterday, at Wrexham, the eighth annual match under Association rules between England and Wales was played in fine weather and with the turf in fairly good order. Both sides showed good combination...

So well did they play that shortly before half-time was announced Lewis registered a goal for them. After ends had been changed, England severely pressed their opponents, and from a free kick near the Welsh posts Amos scored, the ball going through off the defending goalkeeper...

ENGLAND WIN BRITISH CHAMPIONSHIP FOR FIRST TIME, DESPITE PLAYING ALL OF THEIR GAMES AWAY FROM HOME

WALES ELIMINATED

It was on 29 March 1886 that the Prime Minister announced that the Irish Home Rule Bill would be read the following month.

 
   

The Times - Monday 12th April, 1886

SCOTLAND 4 WALES 1

Hampden Park, Glasgow, was on Saturday the scene of the 11th annual contest under Association rules between Scotland and Wales...

Having lost the toss, Scotland kicked off. Both teams showed very good form. At half-time the home side were leading by one goal to none. After the change of ends, the Scottish team more than maintained their advantage. It was not long before Harrower gained the second goal for them, while two others, kicked by Allan, increased their score to four to love. By no means disheartened at these reverses, the Welsh team played up in a most determined manner, and eventually drove the ball between the posts. This proved the final point, and the Scotchmen were declared the winners by four goals to one.

SCOTLAND RETAIN BRITISH CHAMPIONSHIP FOR THIRD SUCCESSIVE YEAR BY SHARING IT WITH ENGLAND, AND ARE THE FIRST TO WIN IT THREE TIMES

Season 1886-87

   

The Times - Monday 29th November, 1886

GLASGOW 2 LONDON 2
after Glasgow had led 2-0.

Despite the fact that the London Association had by no means a representative side at Glasgow on Saturday, they managed to make a draw of the annual match with the home team. The afternoon was fine, and the game was witnessed by about 4,000 spectators...

   

The Times - Monday 20th December, 1886

GENTLEMEN 2 PLAYERS 3

Two powerful teams were selected by the Football Association to take part in the first of the two annual matches played under the above title at Stoke-on-Trent last Saturday. At starting the combination of the professionals was better than that of their opponents. Both teams, however, played with determination, though the condition of the ground was all against good football...

   

The Times - Monday 24th January, 1887

NORTH 4 SOUTH 2

On Saturday last was played the eighth annual match between North and South under Association rules at the Aston Lower Grounds, Birmingham. The attendance was not so large as had been anticipated, but the play proved interesting. Successful in the toss, the South at first had the advantage of playing slightly down hill, and at 20 minutes to 3 Lindley kicked off...

 
29 05-Feb-1887 England 7 Ireland 0 [4-0] Bramall Lane, Highfield, Sheffield BC HW
   

The Times - Monday 7th February, 1887

Saturday last was also appointed for the sixth annual match between England and Ireland under Association rules at Bramall-lane, Sheffield, where, the weather being fine, several thousand on-lookers assembled. Successful in the toss, the visitors played with the wind in their favour and a little before 3 o clock Lindley started the ball. The English at once acted on the aggressive and Dewhurst kicked a goal. The play for a little while became more even, but the home side were faster and kicked more skilfully than their opponents. Cobbold, with a well-aimed shot from the left side, sent the ball between the posts. Lindley then finished up a fine run by securing a third goal for England, and prior to half-time the same player obtained a fourth. Ends were changed, and the home eleven speedily resumed the aggressive. Cobbold obtained a fifth goal and Lindley added a sixth. In spite of these continuous reverses, Ireland played in a very determined manner, and once they very nearly scored. Towards the close of the match however, Dewhurst gained a seventh point.

JOINT CHAMPIONS, ENGLAND GO TOP OF BRITISH CHAMPIONSHIP

Meanwhile, Aston Villa defeated Horncastle, 5-0, at their Perry Barr ground, in the fifth round of the F.A. Cup, ex-England international, Arthur Brown scoring a hat-trick. This put Villa into the quarter-finals for the first time and they went on to lift the trophy.

It was on 5 February 1887 that 38 people died when a train crashed off the White River Bridge in Vermont, onto the frozen river and was then engulfed in flames.

 
   

The Times - Monday 21st February, 1887

SCOTLAND 4 IRELAND 1

The fourth annual match under Association rules between Ireland and Scotland was decided at Hampden-park, Glasgow, in the presence of between 3,000 and 4,000 spectators. Scotland had won the three previous games, scoring altogether 20 goals to four. Ireland at first had the advantage of a slight wind. The ball was dribbled into the visitors' territory quickly after the start, and scarcely five minutes had elapsed when Watt kicked the first goal for Scotland. The home eleven got much the better of the play after the sides had crossed over. They added a couple of goals (kicked by Jenkinson and Johnston) to their score; while Ireland were unable to gain anything further. Consequently Scotland were victorious by four goals to one.

CHAMPIONS FOR THE PAST THREE YEARS, SCOTLAND GO JOINT TOP OF BRITISH CHAMPIONSHIP WITH JOINT CHAMPIONS, ENGLAND

IRELAND ELIMINATED

 
30 26-Feb-1887 England 4 Wales 0 [1-0] Surrey Cricket Ground, The Oval, Kennington, London BC HW
   

The Times - Monday 28th February, 1887

The team chosen to represent England in this international match at the Oval on Saturday proved far too powerful for Wales...

About 4,000 people witnessed the contest. Choice of positions fell to England, who selected the western goal, which gave them the advantage of a light wind, and at five minutes past 3 Wilding kicked off for Wales...

England continued their aggressive tactics, and when rather more than a quarter of an hour had elapsed Cobbold shot the ball between the posts off one of the defending backs...

Ten minutes had elapsed since half-time when a fine middle by Cobbold enabled Lindley to register the second goal for England, who quickly afterwards again pressed their opponents...

Good passing among the forwards ended in Cobbold securing a third point for England, while a fourth resulted from the foot of Lindley.

JOINT CHAMPIONS, ENGLAND GO BACK CLEAR AT TOP OF BRITISH CHAMPIONSHIP, BUT HAVE PLAYED A GAME MORE THAN THE CHAMPIONS FOR THE PAST THREE YEARS, SCOTLAND, AND WALES

Meanwhile, Preston North End defeated the F.A. Cup holders, Blackburn Rovers, 8-2.

It was on 26 Feb 1887 that southern France and northern Italy were counting the cost of the Mediterranean earthquake, three days earlier. The death toll reached an estimated 2000 people.

 
   

The Times - Monday 14th March, 1887

IRELAND 4 WALES 1

On Saturday this international match was played at Belfast. Although the weather was bitterly cold there were nearly 4,000 spectators present. The home side at first had the wind in their favour. This advantage they quickly turned to account, and Gibb shot the ball between the posts, while before half-time arrived Ireland gained a second goal. Ends having been changed, the Welshmen played up more vigorously, and Sabine sent the ball under the cross-bar. The Irishmen soon reasserted themselves, however, and Peyden kicked a third goal after good runs by Stansfield and Sherrard. The last-named player gained another point for Ireland, who were victorious by four goals to one.

WALES ELIMINATED

 
31 19-Mar-1887 England 2 Scotland 3 [1-1] Leamington Street, Blackburn BC HL
   

The Times - Monday 21st March, 1887

The Football Association this year decided to play the international match with Scotland at Blackburn. No more appropriate ground could have been chosen, considering the keen interest that has been taken in the game by the district and the skill shown there, a proof of which lies in the fact that previous to this season the national competition had been four times successfully carried off by Blackburn teams. Though threatening in the early morning, the weather proved bright and seasonable. This, however, had its drawback. The hot sun soon caused the frost to disappear, and by the time fixed for the start the turf was in an almost unplayable condition. Great preparation had been made for the match, and special trains from Scotland and other parts brought large numbers of visitors. It was estimated that there were upwards of 12,000 people present. Both teams were thoroughly representative. Within a few minutes of 3 30 the game was begun by Sellars, England at first playing down the incline, with the wind at their backs...

The home players again visited their rivals' half, but Arnott relieved his side by a long kick, while M'Coll finished up a splendid run along the left side and scored the first goal for Scotland. A very short time had elapsed, when a combined rush by the forwards ended in Lindley equalising matters...

M'Coll and Allan resisted this invasion, and a free kick fell to the Scotchmen. This was undertaken by Keir with such judgement that the ball was scrimmaged through, and Scotland scored their second goal. Again the record was made level, Dewhurst scoring from a fine pass by Bambridge. Directly afterwards Allan registered a third goal for the Scotchmen; the last three points had been scored in less than five minutes...

North British Daily Mail - Monday 21st March, 1887

The play was very good considering that the men had to operate with a heavy and dirt-laden ball...

Shooting was very difficult but Lindley and Bambridge were too slow in getting rid of the ball. Cobbold was good, but Dewhurst has been seen to better advantage, while the same might be said of the Walters brothers...

The contest was a match between goalkeepers and Roberts (England) fumbled twice and lost the match...

Daily Mail - Monday 21st March, 1887

A. M. Walters handled the ball in trying to get it away, and Scotland had a free kick in front of the home citadel. The ball was rushed down at the forest of players round the goal, and seemed to pass all but keeper Roberts, who fancied someone had touched it, and got his hand on the leather but was charged through the goal, thus causing the registration of the second goal for Scotland.

No sooner had the start been made from the centre than Dewhurst shot the ball in, and Cobbold helped it past Macauley, an appeal for offside being disallowed, and the scores were two each...

SCOTLAND RETAIN BRITISH CHAMPIONSHIP FOR FOURTH SUCCESSIVE YEAR AND ARE THE FIRST TO WIN IT FOUR TIMES

It was on 19 March 1887 that Father Keller, a Dublin priest, was imprisoned in Kilmainham Jail for refusing to disclose details relating to a bankruptcy case, on the grounds that they were given to him in confidence as a clergyman. He was released two months later by the Court of Appeal.

 
   

The Times - Tuesday 22nd March, 1887

WALES 0 SCOTLAND 2

This annual Association match was played on Wrexham racecourse yesterday. Scotland won the toss and left their opponents to kick-off. The ball was soon returned, and conducted in a most threatening way up to the Welsh lines. Davies, however, showed very good defence, and runs on the part of R. Jones and Challen sent the play into the Scotch quarters. Lewis made a well-aimed shot at goal, but Macaulay sent the ball away. A run along the right side of the ground was then made by Marshall and Robertson. The former very nearly kicked a goal, but Trainer just managed to strike the ball on one side. At length the Scotch forwards invaded their rivals' territory, and Robertson sent the ball under the cross-bar. The sides crossed over, and excellent runs were soon made by Sellars and Allan, but the defence of the Welsh was very dogged. Subsequently the Scotch again became the aggressors, and Allan kicked the ball through. Scotland were left the winners by two goals to none.

SCOTLAND WIN BRITISH CHAMPIONSHIP OUTRIGHT FOR A RECORD THIRD TIME IN FOUR YEARS

ENGLAND ELIMINATED, DESPITE PLAYING ALL OF THEIR GAMES AT HOME

   

The Times - Monday 4th April, 1887

BIRMINGHAM 3 LONDON 0
with goals coming from Sayer, Brodie and Shaw in a ten-minute period during the second half.

There was a large attendance of spectators at Perry Barr to witness the above game on Saturday. The visitors at first had the advantage of the incline, and Brodie kicked off for Birmingham...

Season 1887-88

   

The Times - Monday 16th January, 1888

SOUTH 1 NORTH 3

Saturday last was the day appointed for the ninth annual match between these divisions under Association rules at Kennington Oval. Nearly 3,000 spectators were present. From various causes neither side was able to put its best eleven into the field. Play began at 2 40, when the North, who had won the toss, defended the Gasometer goal, which gave them the benefit of the wind...

 
32 04-Feb-1888 Wales 1 England 5 [1-1] Nantwich Road, Crewe BC AW
   

The Times - Monday 6th February, 1888

The excellent cricket ground of the Alexandra club at Crewe was selected by the Welsh Association for the decision of their international match with England last Saturday. The game had been anticipated with great interest, and between 7,000 and 8,000 people were present...

Good defence was shown by Davies and Mills-Roberts, but the latter was eventually beaten by a shot by Dewhurst, who scored the first goal. Immediately on resuming the Welsh forwards attacked, and, amid applause, Doughty kicked a goal for them, thus bringing the score level...

Some time elapsed before Dewhurst secured a second goal for England. A long shot by Woodhall soon gave them a third. Lindley finished up a lengthy run by scoring a fourth goal and Goodall added a fifth...

ENGLAND GO TOP OF BRITISH CHAMPIONSHIP

LONDON 0 BIRMINGHAM 5

The 15th annual match between these centres of Association football attracted a numerous company of spectators to Kennington-oval. Birmingham put a strong eleven into the field and won by five goals to none.

Meanwhile, Renton thrashed Cambuslang, 6-1, at Hampden Park, to record the biggest ever victory in a Scottish Cup Final.

It was on 3 February 1888 that two Americans, Thomas Callan and Michael Harkins were sentenced to 15 years in prison for possession of dynamite at a house in London.

 
   

The Times - Monday 5th March, 1888

WALES 11 IRELAND 0

The followers of the Association game in Ireland and Wales decided their annual match at Wrexham. The Welshmen carried all before them, and won the match by 11 goals to none.

WALES GO JOINT TOP OF BRITISH CHAMPIONSHIP WITH ENGLAND, BUT HAVE PLAYED A GAME MORE

LONDON 3 GLASGOW 0

A numerous company gathered at Kennington Oval to witness the sixth annual match between these centres of Association football. The weather proved seasonal, and the play was spirited. In the first half of the game Lindley and Burns obtained goals for London, for whom a third was added by Burns after the sides had crossed over. Glasgow did not score, and thus London won by three goals to none.

   

The Times - Monday 12th March, 1888

SCOTLAND 5 WALES 1

A large company assembled at Edinburgh to witness this international match under Association rules. The Scotch soon acted on the aggressive, and Paul kicked a goal for them, the ball having been well passed to him by Macpherson. For some time the game proceeded without incident, but at the end of half an hour Munro kicked a second goal for the home eleven, for whom a third was soon added. The Welsh play now improved, and prior to half-time J. Doughty kicked a goal for them. The sides having crossed over, the play became a little more even, but Scotland added two goals, and eventually won by five goals to one.

CHAMPIONS FOR THE PAST FOUR YEARS, SCOTLAND GO JOINT TOP OF BRITISH CHAMPIONSHIP WITH ENGLAND, AND WALES, WHO WERE ELIMINATED AFTER COMPLETING ALL OF THEIR FIXTURES

 
33 17-Mar-1888 Scotland 0 England 5 [0-4] Hampden Park, Crosshill, Glasgow BC AW
   

The Times - Monday 19th March, 1888

Many thousand spectators were present at Hampden Park, Glasgow, on Saturday, when the international contest was played under Association rules. Hitherto the Scotch have been most fortunate in these engagements, having registered ten victories against two by their opponents. On this occasion, however, England placed a strong eleven in the field, which gained a complete mastery over their rivals...

A further corner kick fell to England; this was well placed by Howarth, and Allen headed the ball between the posts. This was almost immediately supplemented with a second goal, kicked by Dewhurst after a corner, while the same player soon headed a third. Scotland played up very smartly, but before half-time a fourth goal was gained by their rivals after a foul...

A combined run was effected by Dewhurst and Goodall, which ended in the former kicking a fifth goal...

It was generally admitted that the English eleven was one of the best at all points that has visited Scotland.

North British Daily Mail - Monday 19th March, 1888

The great fault, one cannot help designating it defect, in all previous international elevens, was lack of combination and want of staying power among the forwards, but this could not be laid to their charge on Saturday, for their dribbling, passing and general play were splendid, and much admired by all who saw the contest, and we can scarcely single out individual worth...

Daily Mail - Monday 19th March, 1888

The Scottish forwards could not match their English counterparts for speed and fitness...

ENGLAND REGAIN BRITISH CHAMPIONSHIP FOR SECOND TIME IN THREE YEARS

It was on 16 March 1888 that the first German Emperor, Wilhelm the Great, was buried in Berlin. He had died, seven days earlier, at the age of 90.

   

The Times - Monday 26th March, 1888

IRELAND 2 SCOTLAND 10

So powerful was the Scotch team put into the field against Ireland at Belfast that this fifth Association match proved a most one-sided affair. The Scotch won by ten goals to two.

CHAMPIONS FOR THE PAST FOUR YEARS, SCOTLAND GO BACK JOINT TOP OF BRITISH CHAMPIONSHIP WITH NEW CHAMPIONS, ENGLAND, BUT HAVE COMPLETED THEIR FIXTURES

IRELAND ELIMINATED

 
34 07-Apr-1888 Ireland 1 England 5 [1-3] Ulster Cricket Ground, Ballynafeigh Park, Belfast BC AW
   

The Times - Monday 9th April, 1888

Many thousand spectators were present on the Belfast ground on Saturday to witness the seventh match between England and Ireland under Association rules. On each of the previous occasions success attended England, and Saturday's contest did not furnish an exception. The afternoon was favourable and the turf in excellent order. England won the toss, and at first elected to play with the wind in their favour. J. W. Vickers started the ball for the home team. The visitors soon acted on the aggressive, and, within ten minutes of the kick-off, Dewhurst obtained a goal for them. Quickly afterwards Allen also sent the ball between the posts. Ireland now played up in a very determined manner, and Crone scored a goal for them; but prior to half-time a third was kicked for England by Allen...

Allen kicked a fourth goal and Lindley a fifth for the visitors...

ENGLAND WIN BRITISH CHAMPIONSHIP OUTRIGHT FOR THE FIRST TIME

CHAMPIONS FOR THE PAST FOUR YEARS, SCOTLAND, ELIMINATED

Halifax defeated the holders, Wakefield Trinity, at Leeds, to win the Yorkshire Cup, which had become the first rugby knockout competition. Both clubs would join the Rugby League seven years later, when it split from the Rugby Union.

It was on 6 April 1888 that five men were killed at Douglas Bank Colliery in Wigan. Three of them were being lowered into the shaft in a large iron bucket when the wires broke and they plummeted onto others down below.

Season 1888-89

   

The Times - Monday 21st January, 1889

NORTH 1 SOUTH 2

Previous to Saturday last the annual match between these divisions of England under the Association code had not been decided further north than Sheffield, which, together with London, Birmingham, and Derby had witnessed the contest since its establishment in the season of 1879-80. On Saturday the match was played at Sunderland in the presence of about 10,000 spectators. The South sent a powerful eleven, while the home side for the most part consisted of players who had not taken part in games of any great prominence. However, a very interesting match was the result...

 
35 23-Feb-1889 England 4 Wales 1 [1-1] Victoria Ground, Stoke-Upon-Trent BC HW
   

The Times - Monday 25th February, 1889

Many thousand spectators witnessed the annual encounter between England and Wales, played on Saturday under Association rules at Stoke. The visitors at first had the wind in their favour...

Wales now played up with greater determination, and when Moon had well met one attack, another was made, which ended in Owen scoring the first goal, after a quarter of an hour's play...

After a couple of ineffectual attempts to put the ball through, Goodall, who received it from Bassett, kicked a goal, and thus brought the score even...

England now had the advantage of the wind, and turned it to good account. A corner-kick fell to them, and this was so well made that Bassett registered a second goal. Other attacks were well met by Trainor; but at length Dewhurst shot the ball between the posts, thus gaining a third point for the home eleven...

Townley effected a good run and passed to Bassett, who in turn sent the ball over to Southworth, and the last-named shot it between the posts...

CHAMPIONS, ENGLAND GO TOP OF BRITISH CHAMPIONSHIP

Meanwhile, in the annual universities match, Cambridge and Oxford drew, 1-1, at Queen's Club in West Kensington.

It was on 22 February 1889 that three police officers were cleared at Newcastle Assizes of falsifying evidence in the Edlingham burglary case, ten years earlier. The two men convicted at the time had since been released after serving almost ten years in prison, when two other men confessed to the crime.

 
36 02-Mar-1889 England 6 Ireland 1 [3-1] Anfield Road, Liverpool BC HW
   

The Times - Monday 4th March, 1889

In the matches under Association rules England has proved far too powerful for Ireland. Prior to Saturday seven contests had been played and all were won by England. The first victory was by 13 goals to none, while altogether 50 goals have been registered against two by Ireland. On the present occasion the English eleven was not so strong as usual, many of the best players having engagements in the National Cup competition. The game was played at Everton in the presence of 6,000 spectators. Ireland started in fine form, and, after good dribbling by their forwards, Wilton registered the first point for them. As the game progressed the home side greatly improved in combination, and eventually a long shot by Weir brought the score level. A very few minutes had elapsed when Yates obtained a second goal for England, and the same player subsequently added a third...

Lofthouse then got away and added a fourth goal, while a fifth came from the foot of Brodie. England still had much the better of the play, and Yates credited them with a sixth point...

CHAMPIONS, ENGLAND GO FOUR POINTS CLEAR AT TOP OF BRITISH CHAMPIONSHIP

Meanwhile, Jack Southworth, who had made a goalscoring debut for England, the previous week, helped himself to four goals, as Blackburn Rovers thrashed Aston Villa, 8-1, to reach the F.A. Cup semi-finals. Villa had recently finished runners-up to the 'invincible' Preston North End team in the inaugural Football League Championship. Blackburn lost to Wolves in the semi-finals and it was Preston, who went on to complete the first League and Cup double.

It was on 1 March 1889 that Richard Pigott, an Irish journalist, committed suicide by shooting himself in a Madrid hotel room, after being exposed as a forger of letters intimating that Charles Parnell, the leader of the Irish Parliamentary Party, had supported the Phoenix Park murders of 1882.

 
   

The Times - Monday 11th March, 1889

SCOTLAND 7 IRELAND 0

Ireland proved no match for the Scotch eleven at Glasgow on Saturday. It was the sixth contest between the Associations, and, as in all the previous games, Scotland were able to claim a substantial advantage. There was a very large company present in Ibrox-park. The home side at first had the wind at their backs, and Watt speedily scored for them. This early success was followed by a second goal from the foot of Watt, while prior to change of ends two others were recorded. During the second period Scotland were generally the aggressors, and when "Time" was called they had won by seven goals to none.

IRELAND ELIMINATED

   

The Times - Monday 25th March, 1889

GLASGOW 5 LONDON 1

Hampden Park, Glasgow, was visited by a large number of people on Saturday, when the annual match between the London and Glasgow associations was decided. The Scotchmen won the toss and selected the goal, which gave them the advantage of the wind...

 
37 13-Apr-1889 England 2 Scotland 3 [2-0] Surrey Cricket Ground, The Oval, Kennington, London BC HL
   

The Times - Monday 15th April, 1889

There were about 10,000 spectators at Kennington Oval on Saturday to witness the 18th annual match between England and Scotland.

Successful in the toss the Englishmen chose the Clayton-street goal, and Oswald kicked off for Scotland, who had a strong wind in their faces. After some good play on both sides, Goodall finished up a short run with a shot which completely beat the keeper, and placed the first goal to the credit of England, and before the interval Weir scored out of a scrimmage by a capital shot. Thus England had the substantial lead of two goals to none. In the second part of the game Oswald passed to Munro, and the latter registered a goal for Scotland; and not more than ten minutes had elapsed when Oswald sent in a shot which brought the score level. Quickly afterwards the Scotch forwards renewed their attack, and M'Laren, with a highland swift kick, placed a third goal to their credit...

SCOTLAND REGAIN BRITISH CHAMPIONSHIP FOR FIFTH TIME IN SIX YEARS AND ARE THE FIRST TO WIN IT FIVE TIMES

It was on 14 April 1889 that a French prosecution committee was set up to investigate the corrupt activities of the reactionary politician, General Boulanger, who was ultimately condemned by the Senate and deported.

 
   

The Times - Tuesday 16th April, 1889

WALES 0 SCOTLAND 0

The fourteenth annual match under Association rules between Wales and Scotland was played yesterday on the racecourse at Wrexham. Scotland had an entirely different team from that which defeated England at the Oval on Saturday. Considerable interest was aroused by the contest, and there was a good muster of spectators. Owing to the late arrival of one of the home side, it was some time after 4 o'clock when Scotland kicked off. Both teams showed capital defence, and the result was a drawn game, nothing being scored. In previous annual contests Scotland has won every match since 1876 inclusive, and in those contests scored altogether 59 goals to six.

SCOTLAND WIN BRITISH CHAMPIONSHIP OUTRIGHT FOR A RECORD FOURTH TIME IN SIX YEARS

ENGLAND AND WALES ELIMINATED, DESPITE ENGLAND PLAYING ALL OF THEIR GAMES AT HOME

   

The Times - Monday 29th April, 1889

IRELAND 1 WALES 3

On Saturday a Welsh team visited Belfast and played their eighth annual match against Ireland under Association rules at Ballynafeigh. The weather was fine and there was a large company present. Wales won the toss and left their opponents to kick off. Soon after this had been done Lemon shot the ball between the posts and registered the first goal for the home side. For the next quarter of an hour the play was fast, and then Jarrett, for the visitors, brought the score level, while another point was obtained for them ten minutes afterwards...

Wales, however, managed to add another goal - kicked by Owen, who received the ball from Lewis. The home side did not gain anything beyond the solitary point mentioned, and thus the Principality were victorious by three goals to one...

Season 1889-90

   

The Times - Tuesday 14th January, 1890

SOUTH 3 NORTH 1

The one match played each season by followers of the dribbling game between the divisions of North and South was decided yesterday at Kennington Oval, in the presence of over 4,000 persons. Successful in the toss, the South at first defended the Vauxhall goal, with the wind in their favour. At five minutes to 3 the visitors kicked off...

   

The Times - Monday 27th January, 1890

LONDON 2 GLASGOW 3

Since the establishment of the match eight years ago between these two centres of Association football in England and Scotland their contests have always been regarded with great interest. This was fully demonstrated on Saturday, when, although the weather was very boisterous, over 4,000 spectators visited Kennington Oval to witness this season's encounter. The ground, already rendered almost impossible through previous rains, was not improved by several heavy downpours which fell during the afternoon. Successful in the toss, the home team at first played with the wind in their favour from the Vauxhall end. Paul started the ball at ten minutes past 3...

   

The Times - Monday 10th February, 1890

WALES 5 IRELAND 2

The superiority which the Welsh elevens have hitherto shown over Ireland was maintained at Shrewsbury on Saturday, where the ninth annual match was played in the presence of between four and five thousand people. The visitors won the toss and at first had the wind in their favour, and Owen started the ball. Within ten minutes of the kick off Dalton obtained a goal for Ireland after a corner-kick...

A run by Lewis, on the right, ended in his passing the ball across to Wilcocks, who kicked it between the posts for the home team. Owen subsequently gained a further goal for Wales, while another point was placed to the credit of Ireland, the score at half-time being two goals each. Positions having been changed, the Welsh, with the wind at their backs, got far the better of the play, despite the determined opposition of their rivals. Three more goals were registered for them, and, as Ireland did not score further, the match ended in a victory for Wales by five goals to two.

WALES GO TOP OF BRITISH CHAMPIONSHIP

 
38 15-Mar-1890 Wales 1 England 3 [1-0] Racecourse Ground, Mold Road, Wrexham BC AW
 
38 15-Mar-1890 Ireland 1 England 9 [0-3] Ulster Cricket Ground, Ballynafeigh Park, Belfast BC AW
   

The Times - Monday 17th March, 1890

There was a large gathering on the racecourse at Wrexham to witness the annual match between England and Wales. Lewis started the ball for the home team, but the visitors soon acted on the aggressive...

Jones and Doughty effected good runs, after which a free kick was allowed to the Welsh. This was at once followed by a goal, secured by Lewis...

At length the English made an incursion into their rivals' territory, and Currey sent the ball between the posts, thus bringing the score level...

At length Currey got in possession, and with a skilful shot obtained a second goal for England...

Lindley, however, quickly afterwards scored another goal.

The English eleven visited Belfast and engaged in their ninth annual match against Ireland. Although the weather was wet and uncomfortable, there was a large muster of onlookers. The home team won the toss, and at 3 30 Geary kicked off...

The English forwards worked well together, and in the first portion of the match three goals were placed to their credit, while the Irish were unable to secure a point. Positions having been reversed, the visitors continued for some time to have the advantage. In a little over a quarter of an hour two further goals were obtained for them. The home team now played more vigorously, and at length they scored a point. The English were not slow, however, in re-asserting themselves; and, although the Irish defence was at times good, four more goals were secured by the visitors.

ENGLAND GO TOP OF BRITISH CHAMPIONSHIP

IRELAND ELIMINATED

Meanwhile, Everton's 3-0 win over Derby at Anfield put them level on points with League Champions, Preston, with only one match remaining. Defeat at West Brom, the following week, effectively ended their chances, and Preston went on to retain the title with a victory at Notts County. It was to be their last League Championship success.

It was on 16 March 1890 that the decision was taken to flood the Morfa Colliery at Port Talbot, as it continued to burn following an explosion, which killed 87 men, five days earlier. Some of the survivors described seeing ghostly apparitions below ground in the weeks before the disaster.

 
   

The Times - Monday 24th March, 1890

SCOTLAND 5 WALES 0

There were about 7,000 spectators at Paisley to witness the 15th annual match between Scotland and Wales. Paul kicked off for the home team, who had lost the toss. Within a quarter of an hour of the start Wilson kicked a goal for Scotland, and before half-time Paul obtained a second and Dunlop a third, while Wales failed to gain a point. On changing ends the visitors strove hard to score; but the goal-keeping of Gillespie was very safe. The Scotch, on the other hand, increased their advantage. Out of some open play in front of the posts a fourth goal was registered for them, and soon afterwards Paul kicked the ball under the cross-bar. Thus the announcement of "Time" left Scotland the winners by five goals to none.

WALES ELIMINATED

   

The Times - Monday 31st March, 1890

IRELAND 1 SCOTLAND 4

Elevens representing these countries met on Saturday at Belfast. Play began by Macpherson kicking off for Scotland. The ball had not long been started when the Scotch forwards attacked with great spirit, and Rankin placed the first goal to the credit of the visitors. The Irishmen played up pluckily and equalized. Both goals were in turn attacked, but no other score was obtained before half-time, when the game stood at one-all. After change of ends the Scotchmen reasserted themselves, and Rankin quickly placed them in a majority of two to one. A couple of goals were afterwards added, and Ireland were ultimately defeated by four goals to one.

CHAMPIONS, SCOTLAND GO JOINT TOP OF BRITISH CHAMPIONSHIP WITH ENGLAND

 
40 05-Apr-1890 Scotland 1 England 1 [1-1] Hampden Park, Crosshill, Glasgow BC AD
   

The Times - Monday 7th April, 1890

The match between England and Scotland at Glasgow on Saturday resulted in a close and well-played game. This year's game attracted more attention than ever; but few anticipated the immense gathering of spectators at Hampden Park. The numbers were variously estimated from 25,000 to 30,000. There were six Corinthians in the English eleven, which had been chosen with great care. The late victories of the Queen's Park and Third Lanark teams in London over the Corinthians gave the Scotchmen additional hopes of success in the international. The Glasgow clubs furnished the greater portion of the Scotch team, in which Wilson, who played so well on the Oval a fortnight ago, filled the important post of goal-keeper. The weather was fine, and with the ground dry a fast game was the result. Choice of positions fell to England, who, at first, had the advantage of the wind, and the Scotchmen kicked off...

It was passed out to Wood, who effected a brilliant run, which he finished up with a goal for England in a little less than 20 minutes of the start...

The ball was taken towards the centre. Robertson, however, kicked it close up to the goal, and M'Pherson, amid great cheering, brought the score level...

It was a capital game and the interest was sustained throughout. The combination of both teams was excellent, especially the left wing play of the English. The goal keeping at both ends was very safe, and altogether there was very little to choose between the sides.

North British Daily Mail - Monday 7th April 1890

As early as 12 o'clock the crowd began to gather thick and fast in lovely weather and a pleasing prospect before them.

Up till close on the time for starting, the immense strain round the substantial paling kept the crowd in position, but at length the wave became too powerful opposite the gate stand and burst. They rushed into the arena and at other parts of the field the more unruly soon followed their example and for some time the touch-line was a scene of surging humanity.

Daily Mail - Monday 7th April 1890

The Englishmen, as is usually the case, shone out brilliantly at the start, but towards the close of the day the hard work told on the strangers, and in the last quarter of an hour they were lucky in making it a draw. Their goal was again and again besieged in a way never before seen at the close of an international.

SCOTLAND RETAIN BRITISH CHAMPIONSHIP FOR SIXTH TIME IN SEVEN YEARS AND ARE THE FIRST TO WIN IT SIX TIMES

ENGLAND REGAIN BRITISH CHAMPIONSHIP FOR THIRD TIME IN FIVE YEARS, DESPITE PLAYING ALL OF THEIR GAMES AWAY FROM HOME, AND PLAYING TWO AT THE SAME TIME

It was on 4 April 1890 that the Home Secretary, Henry Matthews spared the life of 16-year-old, George Davies after he was sentenced to death for the murder of his father in Crewe, three months earlier. His brother, Richard, who was 19, however, was hanged for the crime, four days later, despite insisting that it was only his brother that had yielded the axe on their father. George's sentence was commuted to life in prison.

 

Please note: excerpts from Bell’s Life and Sporting Chronicle are taken from ‘England v. Scotland’ by Brian James (Pelham Books Ltd. 1969).

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GI